Carson’s Citizens Briefing for President-Elect Barack Obama

Center for a Stateless Society Research Associate Kevin Carson has posted a Citizen’s Briefing at the change.gov web site, entitled “Easing the Transition to an Alternative Economy“, which essentially summarizes his recently published study “Industrial Policy: New Wine in Old Bottles” for U.S. President-Elect Barack Obama.

Change.gov is an official web site of the U.S. presidential transition team. Supporters are encouraged to vote for Carson’s briefing at the site.

Bloggers Roundtable Conference Call — February 14th, 2009

On Saturday February 14th, 2009 at 10:00 AM Central time, please join us for our monthly Bloggers Roundtable Conference Call. The informal agenda is simply open chat on the Center, current events and anarchism.

Conference Dial-in Number: (712) 432-0600 Participant Access Code: 525118#On Saturday January 10th, 2009 at 10:00 AM Central time, please join us for our 2nd monthly Bloggers Roundtable Conference Call. The informal agenda is simply open chat on current events and their impact on efforts to spread market anarchism, thoughts on anarchist strategy and related topics.

Conference Dial-in Number: (712) 432-0600 Participant Access Code: 525118#

Organization Theory: A Libertarian Perspective

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=bradspanglerc-20&o=1&p=8&l=as1&asins=1439221995&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr
This book applies the economic principles of individualist anarchism, as developed in Studies in Mutualist Political Economy, to the study of the large organization. It integrates the insights of mainstream organization theory into that framework, along with those of more radical thinkers like Ivan Illich, Paul Goodman, and R.A. Wilson. Part One examines the ways in which state intervention in the market, including subsidies to the inefficiency costs of large size and regulatory protection against the competitive consequences of inefficiency, skews the size of the predominant business artificially upward to an extent that simply could not prevail in a free market. Part Two examines the effects of such large organizational size on the character of the system as a whole. Part Three examines the internal pathologies and contradictions of organizations larger than a free market could support. And Part Four surveys the potential building blocks of an alternative, decentralized and libertarian economic order.